Campus Art Tour

 

Explore the Arts


The public art on the campus of Colorado State University-Pueblo cuts across the spectrum of the visual arts. Publicly accessible art ranges from the naturalistic to the geometric and from the playful to the more seriously minded. No matter what motivated the creation of these works, each one is evocative of the history of the institution and its aspirations.

Some of the more naturalistic campus sculptures recall the visual traditions of Western culture. In these instances, information is literally rendered for the viewer to immediately relate to and appreciate (see 6 and 9). For example, beside the music building, a young girl plays her violin (10). Similarly, closer to the center of campus, a sculptor presents two students exchanging greetings as they make their way to class (2). The Thunder Wolf—the iconic mascot of CSU-Pueblo—dominates a knoll (3) and at another location howls its presence to passersby.

But there are other creative statements made with less naturalistic images and constructions that depend upon the interplay of color, texture, and form to express equally compelling messages. On the east side of campus leading to the sports complex is the visually arresting “Passage” (1). These gate-like forms guide visitors using regularly shaped steel with naturally oxidized surfaces, providing a man-made yet seemingly natural counterpart to the surrounding landscaping.



When visiting, allow yourself to look beyond the immediate work of art. Consider the environment in which it rests as you contemplate the way in which an artist has assembled various materials to convey an idea, whether that idea be school spirit (the wolves); school activities (the musician or the student couple) or simple humor (the oversized “paper” airplane beside the art building).

Visitors also might consider how these artists used traditional and non-traditional materials and how these contribute to our appreciation of the work. For example, examine 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.

The CSU-Pueblo campus art highlights the possibilities of many different sculptural ideas and materials while showcasing the creative spirit.


Art Walk Brochure






1. “Passage,” by Ken Bernstein, 2008.


2. “Poised for the Future,” by Fred Darpino, 1996, donated by Anthony T. and Theresa H. Capps Capozzolo in memory of Nicola and Nunziata (Salomone) Capozzola.








3. “The Wolf Statue,” by Brenda Daniher, 2004.




4. “Untitled,” by Carl Reed, 1981.









5. “Marvelous Reality,” by Patricia R. Musick and Jay Bonner, 2001-2003 (chemistry theme).
 


6. “Marvelous Reality,” by Patricia R. Musick and Jay Bonner, 2001-2003 (life science theme).




7. “Phase Pathway: H2O,” by Laura Audrey, 2000.







8. ​“Untitled,” by Steve Ranes, 1984, commissioned by the Kelly-Ducy Foundation.






9. “Three-Fold Education,”by Phillip Vallejo, 1988, Sculpture on Campus Project, commissioned by the Kelly-Ducy Foundation.



10. “The Violinist”, by Fred Darpino, 1996, donated by Anthony T. and Theresa H. Capps Capozzolo in memory of Nicola and Nunziata (Salomone) Capozzola.